Course Descriptions

ACCOUNTING FOR LAWYERS (2 credits)
Focuses on financial accounting topics important to a practicing attorney. It introduces students to accounting principles, and covers such matters as interpreting financial statements, the relationship of financial accounting to income tax accounting, and accountant malpractice.

ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES (3 credits)
Covers the administration of estates, including the probate process, inventories, accounts, will contests, estate tax returns, and sale of real estate, with particular emphasis on the rights, duties, and liabilities of fiduciaries. Prerequisite: Wills and Trusts.

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW (3 credits)
Analyzes the regulatory, adjudicatory and policymaking powers of federal, state and local government agencies and their effect on private interests.

ADMIRALTY AND MARITIME LAW (3 credits)
Analyzes the many issues faced in maritime law, including torts, contracts, state and local environmental laws, and international treaties.

ADVANCED LITIGATION SKILLS (3 credits)
Focuses on the skills needed to effectively represent clients in complex litigation settings.

AGING & HEALTHCARE DECISIONMAKING (3 credits)
Deals with related healthcare decisionmaking issues such as informed consent, refusal of treatment, competency, decisionmaking for incompetent people, and assisted suicide.

AGING AND THE LAW (3 credits)
Explores critical legal issues facing the elderly, including incapacity, asset management and protection, long term care, Medicaid eligibility, medical decision making. Focus will be on the use of trusts, powers of attorney, powers of appointment, health care proxy, and Medicaid and tax law. Prerequisite: Wills and Trusts

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (2 credits)
Deals with mediation, arbitration and other alternative methods of resolving disputes.

ASSET PROTECTION AND PLANNING (2 credits)
Explores the planning opportunities under federal and state law to shield individual assets from creditors, taxing authorities, and other interested parties.

AVIATION LAW (3 credits)
Provides an historical perspective of the origins of western law, and then focuses upon tort law, manufacturers liability, governmental responsibility, and the role of the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

BAR ESSAY WRITING & ANALYSIS (3 credits)
This course focuses on honing and improving students’ analytical and writing skills, with a special emphasis on the analytical and writing skills used for successful completion of the essay portion of the bar examination. Students will explore issue spotting techniques and methods of analysis; learn helpful tips for writing essay exams; receive personalized feedback on essays; and review the substantive law necessary to write the essay exam. This is an intensive writing class, and students should expect to complete one in-class essay assignment each week, in addition to other assignments, exercises, and scheduled readings. Students are highly advised to have completed all six substantive courses tested by the Multistate Bar Exam before taking this course.

BAIL TO JAIL (3 credits)
Examines the criminal procedure process from arrest and arraignment through sentencing.

BANKING LAW (2 or 3 credits)
Provides an overview of the roles of federal agencies and also covers charter requirements, bank deposits and accounts, bank collections, commercial and real estate lending, and consumer transactions.

BANKRUPTCY LAW (3 credits)
Deals with the policies and legal principles of the federal bankruptcy laws. Focus is placed on claims cognizable in bankruptcy, the rejection and assumption of executory contracts, automatic stays, Chapter 11 reorganizations, “fresh start” rules, jurisdiction, and other matters.

BASEBALL AND THE LAW (3 credits)
Within the context of baseball, focuses upon antitrust laws, organized labor, collective bargaining, standard contracts, tort law, intellectual property, and franchise relocation.

BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF THE LAW (3 credits)
Examines the interaction between law and economic theory and analysis. The first part of the course focuses on the role of economics in the judicial and legal process and the influence it has in the development of substantive law. The second part of the course focuses on the economic impact of law on products, businesses, markets, and economic development. The course addresses complex questions involving antitrust, taxation, the environment, and the role of lawyers in the economy.

BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS (3 credits)
Examines the legal rules governing the personal and business relationships which arise in agency relationships, partnerships, and corporations.

BUSINESS LITIGATION (3 credits)
Focuses on the trial tactics and strategies involved in representing businesses as plaintiffs and defendants in commercial litigation.

BUSINESS NEGOTIATIONS AND AGREEMENTS (3 credits)
Focuses on business negotiations and the drafting of complex business arrangements.

BUSINESS OF THE PRACTICE OF LAW (3 credits)
This course will introduce law students to the business aspects of the legal profession. The course format will be based around a sample business plan, through which the core business functions of strategic planning, financial accounting, operations, information systems, market analysis and organizational structure will be applied to the practice of law.

The business of law continues to overwhelm the practice of law. No matter where you will find yourself after law school -as a solo practitioner, in a small, medium or large law firm, in an urban legal clinic, in an in-house legal department or working within some part of the judicial system -you will almost certainly be faced with the various business aspects of the practice of law, whether it be management and marketing issues or financial, operational and technology issues. Many lawyers today join the legal profession unprepared for the business of law and, as a result, fail to recognize the importance of the business of law, which will inevitably lead to less than complete satisfaction with the practice of law.

The goal of the course is to provide students with a running start on the business of law, through an understanding of the core business subject areas and how these have been successfully applied to the practice of law.

CASE PREPARATION AND STRATEGY (3 credits)
A study of the actions taken and strategies used in a lawsuit from the time a lawyer is first contacted by a client to the end of a trial. Prerequisite: Evidence.

CIVIL PROCEDURE AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION (4 credits)
A study of the procedural rules governing civil litigation and the methods used to resolve legal disputes.

CHILD WELFARE PRACTICE (3 credits)
This course prepares students to litigate child welfare cases as legal counsel for the Department of Children and Families. Students prepare and participate in all aspects of child welfare proceedings. The course includes instruction on the rules of evidence, the introduction and use of documentary evidence as trial exhibits, direct examination, cross examination and persuasive courtroom communication. Students prepare for and conduct motion hearings, pretrial discovery and trials. Additionally, students participate in administrative proceedings such as Foster Care Reviews and Fair Hearings.

Course Requirements: 
Students are required to have completed courses in Civil Procedure, Criminal Procedure and Evidence. Completion of Family and/or Juvenile Law is also required

CIVIL RIGHTS (2 credits)
Examines the history and development of civil rights in federal and state courts.

CLINIC (3 or 6 credits)
In the clinic course upper level students obtain “hands-on” experience working in various legal settings in the public and private sectors. Prerequisites: 45 credits, Evidence, not on academic probation during the prior 2 semesters, and certification under Rule 3.03.

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AND ARBITRATION (3 credits)
Examines the legal and practical aspects of the collective bargaining process engaged in by labor and management, including the arbitration and enforcement of labor contracts.

COMPARISON OF MASSACHUSETTS AND NATIONAL LAW (6 credits)
Examines the laws of Massachusetts and sister states, and helps prepare students for the bar examination.

COMPLEX LITIGATION (3 credits)
Focuses on the procedural issues encountered in litigation involving multiple parties and cases.

COMPUTER LAW (2 credits)
F ocuses on the legal issues surrounding the creation, use, and transfer of computer hardware and software, including computer crime and the protection of privacy.

CONFLICT OF LAWS (2 or 3 credits)
Concerns choice of laws, the bases for judicial and legislative jurisdiction, and recognition of foreign judgments.

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (4 credits)
Explores the reach of federal power, its relation to the powers of the states, and the civil rights of individuals that are protected by and from governmental power.

CONSUMER RIGHTS (3 credits)
Deals with the protection of consumer interests. It deals with such topics as truth in lending, warranties, credit advertising, billing practices, credit cards, debt collection, credit reports, and false, unfair and deceptive practices.

CONTENTIOUS CRIMINAL PROCEDURES (2 credits)
Explores selected topics associated with Constitutional criminal procedure such as Fourth Amendment issues, the exclusionary rule, and the reach of Miranda, in the context of effective trial and appellate advocacy.

CONTRACTS (5 credits)
Deals with the elements and requirements of contracts and with questions relating to the enforcement of contracts.

CONVEYANCING (3 credits)
Considers all aspects of real estate transactions, including negotiations, contracts, title requirements, delivery of closing documents, and post-closing remedies.

COPYRIGHTS AND TRADEMARKS (2 credits)
Analyzes the legal protections afforded artistic creativity. It examines the rights, formalities, and varied subject matter involved in copyright and trademark law, with particular emphasis on emerging legal doctrines.

CORPORATE AND BUSINESS FINANCE (3 credits)
Examines the legal rules and strategic implications of various corporate and commercial business transactions. Prerequisite: Business Associations.

CORPORATE IN-HOUSE COUNSEL (3 credits)
Introduces students to the special skills and knowledge required to practice in the fish-bowl environment of corporate legal management, where the clients are often as well informed as the lawyer and are looking for preventive legal advice and cost-effective problem solving. Prerequisite: Business Associations.

CORPORATE TAXATION (3 credits)
Examines the rules governing federal income taxation of business corporations.

CREATING A SMALL OR SOLO PRACTICE (2 credits)
Analyzes the small or solo practice as an occupational alternative. The pros and cons of going it alone or associating with other solo practitioners are thoroughly reviewed. The complications and stress which universally attend partnership are explored in depth.

CREATING AND REPRESENTING NEW BUSINESSES (3 credits)
Examines the business problems entrepreneurs face in creating and successfully operating new businesses.

CRIMINAL APPEALS (2 credits)
Focuses upon successful advocacy in writing and arguing appeals of criminal cases.

CRIMINAL DEFENSE CLINIC (3 credits)
Teaches students how to defend criminal cases in Massachusetts.

CRIMINAL DEFENSE STRATEGIES (3 credits)
Focuses on strategies employed to successfully represent criminal defendants in cases currently being litigated.

CRIMINAL LAW (3 credits)
Focuses on the elements of crimes and their defenses.

CRIMINAL PROCEDURE (3 credits)
Analyzes procedural questions relating to criminal law, including such constitutional issues as self-incrimination, search and seizure, right to counsel, and admissibility of confessions.

CYBERSPACE & INTERNET LAW (3 credits)
This course explores legal challenges presented by the Internet, communications and information technologies. We will address, in particular, the interaction of emerging legal and technological rules for the Information Society of the 21st Century. Topics include governance, jurisdiction, intellectual property, privacy and electronic commerce.

DISTRICT COURT PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (3 credits)
Taught by district court judges, this course focuses upon effective advocacy in Massachusetts District Courts.

DISTRICT COURT PROSECUTION (3 credits)
Taught by an assistant district attorney, this course focuses on effective advocacy in Massachusetts District Courts.

DRAFTING & PROSECUTING PATENT AND TRADEMARK APPLICATIONS (2 or 3 credits)
Explores the practical fundamentals of drafting and prosecuting patent and trademark applications through the United States Patent and Trademark Office, including assessment of feasibility and patentability based on the laws governing novelty, utility, and non-obviousness.

DRAFTING CONTRACTS AND AGREEMENTS I AND II (3 credits each)
Teaches students to draft contracts, ranging from simple ones to complex ones. Students study requisite techniques and requirements of drafting, and regularly draft sample agreements.

DRAFTING WILLS AND TRUSTS (2 credits)
Teaches students to draft simple wills, reciprocal wills, pourover wills, revocable trusts, irrevocable trusts, Medicaid trusts, and other estate planning documents. Prerequisite: Wills and Trusts.

EDUCATION LAW (3 credits)
Surveys the laws affecting public and private educational institutions at all levels. Issues covered include collective bargaining, tort liability, and student rights.

EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION LAW (3 credits)
Analyzes the federal and state laws dealing with discrimination in the work place.

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3 credits)
Analyzes the nature and causes of environmental pollution and of emerging legal techniques for its control.

ERISA (3 credits)
Examines the rights and duties of employers and employees under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.

ESTATE TAXATION (3 credits)
Examines Massachusetts and federal estate tax provisions and planning issues arising under them.

EVIDENCE (3 credits)
Surveys the rules governing the use of evidence in trials.

FACTUAL INVESTIGATION (2 credits)
Addresses the need for attorneys to find information, both by examining archival material and interviewing witnesses. Also addresses the legal and ethical requirements guiding an attorney’s own investigation, and techniques of delegation and supervision when the attorney is required to relinquish investigation to a licensed professional.

FAMILY LAW ADVOCACY CLINIC (3 or 6 credits)
Provides upper-level students with hands-on clinical experience representing clients under attorney supervision in the diverse areas of family law practice in Massachusetts.

FAMILY LAW (3 credits)
Analyzes the legal rules governing marriage, divorce, distribution of marital property, child custody, adoption and children’s rights.

FAMILY LAW MEDIATION AND NEGOTIATION (3 credits)
Educates and trains the student in the art of mediation and negotiation using family law, divorce, guardianship, probate and custody issues as a focus. Prerequisite: Family Law.

FEDERAL CRIMES (3 credits)
Examines federal crimes and the practice of criminal law in federal courts, with an emphasis on conspiracy, drug and white-collar crimes, forfeiture, sentencing, and selected rules of procedure and evidence as they interplay with the prosecution and defense of federal crimes.

FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS (3 credits)
Analyzes the federal laws governing the workplace, including the Fair Labor Standards Act, OSHA, ERISA, the Drug-Free Workplace Act, and the Employee Polygraph Protection Act.

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS (2 or 3 credits)
Examines the problems of financial institutions, including banks, savings and loan and insurance companies.

FILM AND THE LEGAL PROCESS (3 credits)
What does law look like? Many people know the legal system only through its representation in popular culture. This seminar uses one aspect of legal popular culture, films about lawyers and law, to examine what law looks like in popular culture. We will consider how lawyers are depicted in popular culture, how that depiction affects lawyers in the practice of law, and how popular culture affects society’s perception of the law. We will also discuss the specific legal, ethical, and political issues raised in the films we watch.

FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR THE FAMILY (2 or 3 credits)
Surveys the many complex issues relating to family financial planning. Trusts, wills, cohabitation agreements, prenuptial and separation agreements, and estate plans are considered.

FIRST AMENDMENT ISSUES (3 credits)
Focuses upon First Amendment issues such as defamation, invasion of privacy, obscenity, ownership of speech, flag burning, prior restraint, and reporters’ privileges.

FIRST AMENDMENT LAW (3 credits)
Survey course covering fundamentals of First Amendment jurisprudence relating to Freedom of Expression, Association and Religion. Course focus is on contemporary Supreme Court cases, including those addressing hate speech, display of the Ten Commandments in public places, and aid to parochial schools, as well as how the current Court’s First Amendment law compares with that of Courts of the past. Course will also cover issues such as free speech in times of military conflict, popular opinion of First Amendment freedoms, and the role of religion in governmental regulations.

Prerequisite:
Constitutional Law

FRANCHISE LAW (3 credits)
Focuses on state and federal statutes and case law dealing with franchisors and franchisees.

GETTING ELECTED AND ENACTING LEGISLATION (3 credits)
Examines how legislation is created within the political process, and how candidates pursue election through fundraising and political organization.

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE (3 credits)
Over the last few years, scientists, corporations, and environmental experts have begun to express considerable concern about the possible consequences the world faces if it continues burning fossil fuels on a business as usual basis. Because of the urgency with which these concerns have been expressed, a number of different governmental entities have begun to devote considerable time to addressing the problem and looking for solutions. These entities include the President, the Congress, e xecutive agencies, courts, regions, states, and even municipalities. Thus, the course will aim to provide an overview of the interaction of these various entities in coming to grips with what some in the scientific community have labeled the biggest threat humanity has ever faced.
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HEALTH CARE LAW (3 credits)
Examines the American health care system, including the organization and regulation of health care institutions.

IMMIGRATION LAW (2 credits)
Focuses on immigration law and policy, the rights of aliens, and administration and enforcement of the immigration laws by executive agencies.

INDEPENDENT LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP (3 credits)
Students in this course write a significant research paper.

INDEPENDENT THREE-HOUR STUDY (3 credits)
A student in this course writes a significant research paper on a topic of his or her choice under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: 45 credits, Evidence, Motions, no academic probation during prior 2 semesters.

INDIVIDUAL EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS (3 credits)
Focuses on the laws governing the workplace, including legal rules dealing with fair employment, discrimination, wrongful termination and occupational safety.

INDIVIDUAL TAXATION (3 credits)
A study of the rules governing federal income taxation of individuals.

INSURANCE LAW (3 credits)
Explores legal issues of insurance, such as risk classification, indemnity, insurable interests, subrogation, rights at variance with policy provisions, and claims processes.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (2-3 credits)
Surveys the laws involving patents, trademarks and copyrights and their interrelation with the legal areas of contracts, torts, and property law.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS (3 credits)
Examines the laws, doctrines, and regulations governing international business transactions.

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3 credits)
Focuses on topics involving international banking, the balance of payments, exchange rate fluctuations, and the role of the World Bank in international financing.

INTERNATIONAL LAW (3 credits)
Introduces the student to aspects of the legal structure of international relations, exploring issues involving jurisdiction, sovereign immunity and international conflict resolution.

INTERVIEWING AND COUNSELLING (2 credits)
This hands-on course trains students to interview and counsel effectively. Instructional techniques include videotaped roleplaying, student observation, and critiques by the instructor.

INTRODUCTION TO E-COMMERCE (3 credits)
Examines the law and policy issues involved in the conduct of business and advertising over the internet.

INTRODUCTION TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS LAW (3 credits)
Examines domestic and international common carrier, cable television, spectrum allocation and technology issues.

INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET (3 credits)
Trains students to use Internet browsers and search engines, e-mail accounts, word-processing programs, and case and time management software.

ISSUES IMPACTING WOMEN (3 credits)
Societal and legal issues impacting women. The purpose of this course is to (1) provide some historical background of womens’ rights, women lawyers, and other female trailblazers; (2) to provide an understanding of contemporary issues facing women; (3) have students deal with practical considerations for balancing careers & family; (4) assist students in effectively dealing with health, harassment & glass ceiling issues.

JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAM (3 or 6 credits)
Selected students work with Superior, District, and Probate Court judges in Massachusetts, researching and writing memoranda and decisions, and assisting judges during hearings and trials. Prerequisites: 45 credits, Evidence, not on academic probation during the prior 2 semesters, a grade point average of at least 2.5, and certification under Rule 3.03.

JUVENILE LAW (3 credits)
Examines the juvenile justice system, its philosophy, purpose and structure. Neglect and abuse cases, status offenses, and juvenile delinquency proceedings are covered, with special attention to children’s rights.

LABOR ARBITRATION (3 credits)
This course deals with labor arbitration cases and the laws governing labor arbitration.

LAND USE REGULATION (3 credits)
Analyzes the legal doctrines governing use of land in modern society. Attention is devoted to zoning, land use planning, subdivision regulations, rezoning, variances, environmental restrictions, conditional uses, and mandatory dedications.

LANDLORD-TENANT LAW (3 credits)
A study of issues arising between owners of property and their lessees, with emphasis on specific Massachusetts statutes and judicial decisions.

LAW AND PSYCHIATRY: CIVIL AND CRIMINAL ASPECTS (3 credits)
Addresses significant areas of interaction between the legal and psychiatric disciplines, including the insanity defense, civil commitment, and the right to treatment.

LAW OF ELECTRONIC COMMERCE(3 credits)
This course examines the law relating to the developing field of electronic commerce or electronic business. The course is divided into four parts. The first part of the course will examine the legal regimes for electronic commerce including jurisdiction, rule shopping and choice of forum over online transactions. The second part of the course will cover setting up shop online including trademarks and domain names, access and site owner liability. The next part of the course will cover electronic transactions and include making contracts online and electronic payments. The final part will cover regulations including the downloading and exchange of music, software and taxation of transactions conducted over the internet. The course will examine cases and specific examples of e-commerce businesses, which demonstrate how these legal issues apply to particular scenarios.

The course presumes no knowledge of computer systems, e-commerce, or law.

Law Office Technology (1 credits)
Law Office Technology aims to make students aware of the four essential components necessary to make any law office run smoothly and efficiently: (1) case management, (2) document management, (3) on-line research, & (4) speed and security issues. Because the instructor understands that some students will come to the class with greater computing skills than others, he structures each class in ways that will take advantage of the advanced skills of some while improving upon the skills of others. The instructor uses both on-line and hard copy resources to impart the necessary knowledge to students to enable them to hit the ground running after they hang shingles for small or solo law offices.

THE LAW OF SEARCH AND SEIZURE (3 credits)
Focuses on the laws covering search and seizure, the privilege against self-incrimination, and the right to counsel during police custody interrogations.

LEGAL ETHICS AND THE CULTURE OF LAW (3 credits)
Analyzes the ethical rules governing the legal profession and the conduct of lawyers and law firms.

THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS AND LEGISLATIVE DRAFTING (2 or 3 credits)
Students in this course study models of the legislative process, the actual operation of legislative structures, delegation of legislative power, and the application and interpretation of statutes.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT LAW (3 credits)
Examines statutes and case law relating to the powers and duties of municipalities.

MASSACHUSETTS CONSUMER PROTECTION (2 credits)
Deals deals with Massachusetts laws and regulations governing such topics as truth in lending, warranties, credit advertising, billing practices, credit cards, debt collection, credit reports, and false, unfair and deceptive practices.

MASSACHUSETTS EVIDENCE (2 credits)
Taught by a judge, this course focuses on the practical and effective use of Massachusetts rules of evidence.

MASSACHUSETTS WORKERS’ COMPENSATION (2 credits)
Examines the case law, statutes, and regulations governing workers’ compensation in Massachusetts.

MEDIATION, CONCILIATION, AND NEGOTIATION SKILLS TRAINING (2 credits)
Focuses upon training students to mediate and negotiate assorted legal problems.

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE (3 credits)
Examines various issues in medical liability, including causation, damages, claims against multiple defendants, and examination and cross-examination of medical experts.

MENTAL HEALTH TRIAL ADVOCACY (3 credits)
Provides students with a practical understanding of the issues surrounding mental health advocacy, including forced medication, commitment, and competency hearings.

MILITARY LAW (3 credits)
Examines the constitutional and other rights of members of the armed services, the military criminal justice system, the law of armed conflict, and veterans’ benefits issues.

MOTIONS AND LITIGATION PRACTICE (2 credits)
Teaches students how to draft the various special documents used in trial courts and helps them to refine their legal writing skills by drafting concise, clear, and effective pleadings.

NEGOTIATION IN THE LEGAL CONTEXT (2 credits)
Surveys leading theories and common practices of legal negotiators. Emphasis will be placed on weekly exercises designed to enhance negotiating skills.

NEW ENGLAND LAW AND PRACTICE (3 credits)
This class is designed to give MSL students, trained in the law and practice of the Commonwealth, a glimpse at the law and practice of other New England States. Comparisons between specific procedural rules and forms as well as specific statutes encountered by general practitioners in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and Connecticut shall be made on a per topic basis.

NEW HAMPSHIRE PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE (2 credits)
This course focuses upon the rules governing the practice of law in New Hampshire.

ORAL ADVOCACY AND COMMUNICATION (3 credits)
An intensive course in communication and advocacy. Fundamental skills of communication, drama, and speech are stressed. Reviews of student performances on videotape, demonstrations and discussions are utilized to hone students’ advocacy and communication skills.

PATENT LAW AND PATENT APPLICATION PRACTICE (2 credits)
This course focuses exclusively on substantive patent law, patent claims drafting, and patent applications and prosecution through the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Post Conviction Advocacy (3 credits)
Post Conviction Advocacy addresses the issues that arise in the Criminal Justice System after the Defendant’s conviction. What is the attorney’s role after the client has been found guilty? In some cases what an Attorney does after conviction can and may be the most influential factor in determining if the client is placed on probation or sentenced to incarceration. The student will be required to make oral sentencing arguments for both the Defense as well as the Prosecution. Further, the class will address the types of sentences that can be imposed either after conviction at trial or after a change of plea. Students will be involved in a mock Probation violation hearing, which will include presenting evidence and witnesses in team format. It is recommended that students have taken Criminal Law and Procedure.

PRIVATE SECTOR LABOR LAW (3 credits)
Examines the rights and liabilities of employers and employees in the traditional context of the private sector.

PRODUCTS LIABILITY (3 credits)
Examines the law relating to suits against manufacturers and distributors of defective products.

PROPERTY LAW (5 credits)
Analyzes the legal principles governing personal property and real estate.

PROSECUTION AND ADJUDICATION (3 credits)
Focuses upon pre-trial and post-trial strategies in criminal proceedings.

PUBLIC SECTOR LABOR LAW (3 credits)
Examines the regulation of labor and management relations in the public sector, including the right to organize, the scope of the duty to bargain, and the right to strike.

PUBLISHING AND ENTERTAINMENT LAW (3 credits)
Focuses on the common law and federal and state statutory protections afforded to authors, artists, and entertainers.

RACE IN AMERICAN LAW (3 credits)
Explores the competing visions of racial equality that are reflected in United States civil rights legislation and case law, the historical origins of American racism, and the judicial and legislative approaches that have evolved to remedy racial injustice.

REAL ESTATE FINANCING AND CONVEYANCING (3 credits)
Examines the financing of commercial and large scale residential real estate projects, from the perspective of both the lender and the developer.

REAL ESTATE TAXATION (3 credits)
Examines the federal and Massachusetts tax laws governing real estate transactions.

REMEDIES (3 credits)
A study of contemporary problems both inside and outside the court system, as well as an historical review of the principles applicable to contract and tort actions, unjust enrichment, equitable doctrines, damages and restitution.

RESTITUTION (3 credits)
Focuses upon remedies available to rectify unjust enrichment, particularly in cases where tort and contract remedies are not available or are insufficient.

SECURED TRANSACTIONS (3 credits)
Focuses upon the law of secured transactions under article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code.

SECURITIES REGULATION (3 credits)
Examines federal and state regulations of securities, including disclosure requirements, public and private offerings, and remedies and liabilities.

SPECIAL EDUCATION LAW (3 credits)
Examines both federal and state laws and regulations related to school-age students with disabilities, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 71B, and major case law related to special education. Students will also be exposed to related education laws, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitiation Act of 1973, and laws affecting student discipline, English language learners, residency, state and district-wide assessments, and the confidentiality of student records.

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT LAW (3 credits)
Provides a comprehensive review of the field of representation of athletes and artists, including negotiations, contract development and long range impact of personal services contracts.

STATE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (2 credits)
Explores the legal, strategic, and practical factors involved in deciding to rely on state constitutional law in addition to or in lieu of federal constitutional claims.

STATE EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS (3 credits)
Focuses upon state common law and statutes establishing employee rights and remedies.

STATUTORY RIGHTS OF UNION MEMBERS (3 credits)
Examines the federal and state statutory rights afforded union members.

SUPREME COURT AND COURT OF APPEALS PRACTICE (3 credits)
Teaches oral and written advocacy before federal courts of appeal, the United States Supreme Court, and state supreme courts. Prerequisite: Research & Writing II.

TORTS (4 credits)
Focuses on the law governing liability for physical and economic injuries that one person causes another.

UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE (4 credits)
Focuses on the laws governing commercial transactions.

WHITE COLLAR CRIMES (2 credits)
Reviews white collar criminal issues, including securities fraud, mail fraud, environmental crimes, and illegal campaign contributions.

WILLS AND TRUSTS (4 credits)
Deals with the statutes and common law governing wills and trusts.

WOMEN AND THE LAW (2 credits)
Examines the historical and contemporary treatment of women by and under the Constitution, statutes, and common law.

WORKER’S COMPENSATION AND SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY PAYMENTS (3 credits)
Examines the no-fault worker’s compensation laws of Massachusetts and other states, as well as the laws concerning social security disability.

WRITING & LEGAL RESEARCH (3 credits)
The second of the successive legal writing classes at MSLAW, this course builds on the writing skills learned in the first semester and teaches students to write legal memoranda in an office setting. Students in this course take the role of advisor to a hypothetical client. Students will continue to formulate written rules, synthesize multiple authorities, place a rule in a rule structure (IRAC), analyze facts carefully, apply a rule to a set of facts and organize a written discussion. Students will cite legal authorities using proper legal citation format and will learn legal research strategies and the multitude of legal authorities through hands-on library and computer training.

WRITING & LEGAL ADVOCACY (3 credits)
The third of the successive legal writing classes at MSLAW, this course teaches the students how to take the skills learned in the first two semesters and use those skills while acting as an advocate for a client. Students in this course take the role of advocate and officer of the court. The students’ research and writing skills will be hone so they can apply good writing in a persuasive court document. In this class, students will become Westlaw certified, draft a legal memorandum of law to a trial judge, write an appellate brief and argue to a mock appeals court.

WRITING & LEGAL REASONING (3 credits)
The first of the successive legal writing classes at MSLAW, this course introduces students to IRAC, outlining, case briefing, and other skills unique to the study of law. Students will learn how to think critically and analytically and to write concisely and persuasively.

WRITING FOR LAWYERS (3 credits)
Designed to help students refine their writing skills, this course is taught in an intensive, workshop style.


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